mostlysignssomeportents
The frightening thing is that, like most of their other campaigns against women, they see themselves as just warriors fighting for what’s right. This is primarily because they firmly believe that any woman who speaks up on women’s issues is completely disingenuous and only doing it for the purposes of self-promotion, and that any man who does is looking to get laid, because they actually cannot possibly imagine a scenario in which someone would genuinely give a shit about women.
 
Members of this board, as well as “Men’s Rights Activists” in general, tend to go apoplectic at even the most mild implications that women might be human beings. For them, this is simply “not allowed” and must be punished swiftly and severely, as they appear to believe that feminism is the one obstacle in the way of all these pathetic neckbeards getting their pick of supermodel girlfriends who obey their every whim. The goal is to make it as uncomfortable to speak out about misogyny and women’s issues as possible, which is why they go to the wall in terms of harassing women like Emma Watson. At the end of the day, this is the crux of it. It would be sad if it weren’t so vile.

for the tenth anniversary of “lost”

i’ve expanded and completed an essay I first sketched out here on the “second golden age of television.”

the full 6,000 words edition drops this wednesday in the los angeles review of books… here’s a preview…

"My own personal relationship to the “Second Golden Age of Television” up until now can best be summed up in two career-defining events. On the night Lost won the Best Drama Series Emmy, we were quickly hustled to a back-room photo gallery along with the series cast.

While technically not the recipients of the award, cast members are nonetheless invited onto stage and attendant press to spare the viewing public the dystelegenic sight of pasty, monastic scribes who seldom see the light of day, strutting their hour upon the stage after some very unfortunate sartorial decisions.

In this room, a large crowd of photographers stood on tiered risers while the producers, writers and cast posed on a small stage. The reporters, as remains their custom, shouted loudly and endlessly for their subjects to turn toward them so that they could get the best possible picture.

After a while, we handed off the trophies to the cast so they could pose with them. For a moment I found myself slipping into something of a stunned reverie and wandering in front of the stage in a haze of flashbulb lights and loud, demanding voices. My fugue was broken by a shrill shriek from one of the photographers:

“GET OFF THE STAGE, FATBOY, YOU’RE IN MY SHOT OF EVANGELINE!”

“If people bring so much courage to this world the world has to kill them to break them, so of course it kills them. The world breaks every one and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good, and the very gentle, and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too, but there will be no special hurry.”

“If people bring so much courage to this world the world has to kill them to break them, so of course it kills them. The world breaks every one and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good, and the very gentle, and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too, but there will be no special hurry.”